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Old 01-27-2017, 08:30 AM   #1
Alxj64
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Health and Motivation?

I know I am too young to even be having this question but unfortunately I've got some weird health issues that have arisen over the past few years (MS) and am just wondering how others deal with staying motivated to work on their projects while dealing with physical and sometimes mental set backs? Any tricks? Any place of mind you go? I had planned on finishing my truck by this summer but a setback last fall decided that wasn't happening and now that I am starting to feel better, the whole project just seems daunting and I'll admit that I am even somewhat fearful of it.

To be honest, I guess I am just here to seek a common ground from others that I look up to that have been through set backs but figured out a way to continue forward. The truck is no doubt something I love, but so many things have changed with me in the past few months I kinda feel like I may be starting over with my approaches and will have to relearn what I already once knew.

Thoughts?
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Old 02-02-2017, 07:02 AM   #2
Desoto61
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Can't speak for the health issues, but definitely had some issues make me question progress on the project. Most recently seeing some of the work I did not hold up. The thought of having to re-do work that I've already done is depressing.

Most days I think the only reason I made it is I'm stupidly stubborn, but a lot of it is finding benefit in the journey. Some days I just sat in the house and made plans, or did research because I wasn't motivated enough to go sand paint or whatever. Some days it was just going out and cleaning and organizing, or playing with some minor part or problem because I wasn't motivated enough to get into something bigger and more important, or just wanted to feel like I was accomplishing something. **** there are times I sat it aside not only because other projects needed done more, but because I needed to do a project I could finish.

I also remind myself that part of taking all this on was to learn new things and develop new skills, and even if I never finish, I've still learned and done many new things, and that's at least as important as whatever I end up building or not building.

I never set myself a timeline. I had goals, but knew the minute I gave myself a deadline it stopped becoming a hobby I do for fun and became another job. I never expected it to take this long, but I think that applies to every project I've ever done, it's just life.

It's cliche but like anything you do it because that's what you want, I've never understood why anyone wants to run a marathon, all the cheering in the world wouldn't be enough to make me want to do it. But I run every day at home because I need to for me. It feels good when people compliment me on it, but if I only did it for that reason I wouldn't run most days. And just like homework in school, the hardest step is usually motivating yourself to get started. Many years and many thousands of miles later it's still no easier to get up and run in the morning, but I'm always glad I did afterward.

The work you're doing is amazing, and I am envious of the tools and capabilities you are developing as part of this process, but run the race because you want to finish and don't worry about what position you're in, or how much time it takes, the project isn't going anywhere unless you want it to.

Not sure if any of my rambling helps or not LOL, it kind of got away from me.
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Old 02-02-2017, 10:52 AM   #3
Kevin in Ohio
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The past 6 months has been a big change from the norm and have had to deal with some issues. 5 fractured vertabrae in August had me using sick days for the first time in 21 years at my job. No lifting of anything, confined to a chair during healing is a big change. Thankful that nothing was permanent but healing time never goes quickly as wanted.

First of this year I had shoulder surgery from prior wear and tear. Bone spurs and popping and they had to repair some stuff with anchors once in there. Again, working back to get back at it.

Some may have noticed my posting has increased and that is why. It keeps your mind somewhat occupied or distracted. Not much for watching TV and Hollywood as that stuff just depresses/angers me. Attitude has a lot to deal with healing and doing rehab, therapy and treatments go better with that. I'm not much on pain meds either and avoid the overmedicate, pill mentality that most seem to want.

That said, Injuries are different than disease or sickness that escalates. Finding a will or goal for yourself is what I have found seems to work the best. Much like what you have to due with a long term project as you know. Take the victories in each small goal reached. Eventually those small goals start adding up to win a major battle and so on.

It varies person to person but having a friend/conversation base that is positive, helps in my opinion too. Keeping your mind occupied and off the misery path will help you get through.

As I told others when I was doing my truck, life gets in the way sometimes. You'll get there.
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Old 02-02-2017, 09:44 PM   #4
The Other Ross
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Been going through the same thing. Get up,get out and get one task completed. Some days it will lead to more some days not. But the completed task puts that day in the win column.
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Old 02-06-2017, 08:32 PM   #5
53Crusher
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I've never had any Major health issues, so I can't speak to that, but minor ones do cause the occasional set back. If my insurance company knew that most of my emergency room visits were a result of my truck, they might make me sell it. I am somewhat ashamed to say that I started my project nearly seven years ago. If you would have asked me back then how long until I was done... I would have probably said a year.

At the end of the day, this is a hobby for me that should be enjoyable! It's a chance to push away from the computer and desk and get my hands dirty. When I get frustrated or stuck, I just take a step back and give it some time. Self imposed deadlines just create stress for me and that's not part of the game. I've met many wonderful people during this journey and am not sure I will ever REALLY be done.

Now.... I have set one deadline for myself, and that is to have my truck at the 30th VPW rally. Stress is already setting in....... :-)

Have fun and it will happen when it happens!
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Old 02-07-2017, 12:36 PM   #6
Alxj64
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I appreciate all of the words of wisdom and experiences! Just knowing I'm battling a common ground issue is a good nudge. I've started to feel a little better lately and have been slowly getting back into the build on the truck and re-learning what I had been doing to begin with. Its funny and weird though finding myself researching the path that I had been going down and thinking "man, I had a good idea, glad I thought of that!" Note to self this time around, is take notes of what I am doing and not just rely on memory. Figuring out what I had planned for my wiring will be the biggest re-learning curve.

Everyone is right though. There is one beginning and one end, however there is anywhere between one and one million steps in between and its all on how you divide it that makes it seem like a lot or a little.
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Old 02-09-2017, 11:41 AM   #7
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Easy and important things for you to consider would be a healthy diet, a good night's sleep, sufficient [not exhausting] physical activity and maintaining an upbeat attitude. These may sound trivial... but they're your basic foundation.
Mental/emotional support within and outside your family play a big role too.

John
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Old 02-10-2017, 09:53 PM   #8
Greg Coffin
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Alex, I'm glad to hear you are getting back in the saddle. I hear your frustration and questioning whether you really want to do this. I've been plugging away at the 6x6 for 5-1/2 years now, and some days I just want to be rid of the **** thing just so I don't have to look at it anymore. But usually I'm glad to have it, finished or not.

MS can be a real bear to deal with. A good friend of mine has it and sometimes she's down for months at a time, not knowing when she will start to feel normal again. And then there's the "relearning" you mentioned.

All I can say is try not to get discouraged, and try to be okay with taking a break from the project. You set a pretty aggressive timeline for yourself, as well as a very high bar, so it's okay if you miss your "deadline" due to health or other life issues. The truck will be there when you are ready.

Best,
Greg
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Old 02-23-2017, 08:04 PM   #9
Jeremy Horvath
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My Approach

I'm learning to cope with bad days and not be too stressed about my new limitations.
I've also learned to take advantage of the good days, push myself a bit (but more gently than back in the days when I'd change a starter with pins sticking out of my hand!), and try to plan and read up on days when I just don't have it in me. Almost all of our work is done outside, so, the weather plays a big part in the schedule.

I'm committed to getting the bulk of the work done by June rally time. I'm also OK with the possibility that I may show up to just bum a ride or twenty. It's as much about the PW "family" as it is about the trucks.
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Old 05-18-2017, 10:23 AM   #10
solesurvivor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alxj64 View Post
I know I am too young to even be having this question but unfortunately I've got some weird health issues that have arisen over the past few years (MS) and am just wondering how others deal with staying motivated to work on their projects while dealing with physical and sometimes mental set backs? Any tricks? Any place of mind you go? I had planned on finishing my truck by this summer but a setback last fall decided that wasn't happening and now that I am starting to feel better, the whole project just seems daunting and I'll admit that I am even somewhat fearful of it.

To be honest, I guess I am just here to seek a common ground from others that I look up to that have been through set backs but figured out a way to continue forward. The truck is no doubt something I love, but so many things have changed with me in the past few months I kinda feel like I may be starting over with my approaches and will have to relearn what I already once knew.

Thoughts?
I came across your post and thought I could lend some positive mojo your way. I am 57. I have had the same job for 37 years and I am still employed. But its getting harder each day which is to be expected.
But my hobbies include riding my Street Triple R, four wheeling in my jeep with my two dogs, camping, guns, my 69 Dart drag/show car and my 62W300.
In 2011 I had felt weird chest pains and ended up in the hospital with three stents placed in my heart. I just finished radiation and chemo therapy after surgery for stomach cancer. And now I have been diagnosed with an intestinal hernia..yup another surgery.
Now all these things just get in the way but never got me down or depressed. ****ed that I was out of the game a few times but never did I think I am not going to finish this project or go do things with my wife and family. I know its hard. It will be hard. But your mind is what controls what you want to do vs what your body says you can't do. Many time I couldn't move(chemo just zaps the energy out of you) but I pulled the fender off my truck to fix that moronic way the fender next to the door is attached. Now I started off tired but 15 minutes into replacing the anchor bolt the side affects kind of sat on the sidelines while I completed the job(took four hours).
Once done I showered and slept for twelve hours.
Keep on keeping on and keep a positive attitude. Don't hesitate to ask for help. Keep the mind busy through the pain and fatigue and you can keep working on that truck. Its therapy. Not using your mind and muscles is the worst you can do. I don't know how many people told me to stop working on my truck even with my hair failing out(and I had hair past my shoulders). I'll always have these ailments because they never go away. They may go dormant. But they will be back and I'll be ready for it. Please don't let your mind take you out of the game. Play hard. Think positive. You will be surprised what you are made of.
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Old 06-01-2017, 11:37 AM   #11
Alxj64
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Thanks for everyone's responses on this. Its good to know that I am not alone in my struggles. I think life is what happens while you are busy making other plans. Last night was the first time I touched my truck in over a month and I felt great the entire time I was working on it. I am not making it to the Rally this year but it wasn't really an option 6 months ago anyways. This coming weekend is my last weekend of "pre-planned events" so from this point forward I am spending any moment of surplus time, working on this thing and/or coordinating the addition on my garage to have more space to finish and later maintain this life achievement of a machine. Meanwhile I did have one success in life.. I'm now a licensed P.E., so studying this spring consumed quite a bit of "truck time".

Thanks again all, and everyone have fun at the Rally!
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Old 06-01-2017, 02:20 PM   #12
solesurvivor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alxj64 View Post
Thanks for everyone's responses on this. Its good to know that I am not alone in my struggles. I think life is what happens while you are busy making other plans. Last night was the first time I touched my truck in over a month and I felt great the entire time I was working on it. I am not making it to the Rally this year but it wasn't really an option 6 months ago anyways. This coming weekend is my last weekend of "pre-planned events" so from this point forward I am spending any moment of surplus time, working on this thing and/or coordinating the addition on my garage to have more space to finish and later maintain this life achievement of a machine. Meanwhile I did have one success in life.. I'm now a licensed P.E., so studying this spring consumed quite a bit of "truck time".

Thanks again all, and everyone have fun at the Rally!
"There you go man, keep as cool as you can.Face piles and piles of trials
with smiles. It riles them to believe that you perceive the web they weave and keep on thinking free". -The Moody Blues

One of my favorite sayings. Just as your body is coming back to life so is your truck the more you work on both of them. Glad to here you are moving forward


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